Monday, 12 February 2018

EMG Symphony Orchestra Free Open Rehearsal Saint Peter's School Quarry Lane Thursday 1 March "Night at the Museum" Exeter Cathedral Saturday 28 April 2018 Press Release from Ellen Stratton

Music in the Gym
Leo Geyer conducts
EMG Symphony Orchestra
(Photography Nigel Cheffers Heard)

EMG Symphony Orchestra Open Rehearsal
Thursday 1st March 2018, 7.30pm
FREE
St Peter's School, Quarry Lane, Exeter, EX2 5AP
Under-16s to be accompanied by an adult

On Thursday 1st March, EMG Symphony Orchestra and Musical Director Leo Geyer invite you to glimpse "behind the scenes" and get a sneak preview of the orchestra’s spring concert.  This free event provides an opportunity to meet the players and sit in different parts of the room, enabling you to experience a rehearsal from the players' perspective!  EMG’s open rehearsals provide an accessible, friendly introduction to classical music, as well as a chance to see how the orchestra prepares for a public performance.

EMG Symphony Orchestra’s next concert celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM), and for the Open Rehearsal we will focus on Mussorgsky's “Pictures at an Exhibition”, inspired by a visit to an art gallery, and extracts from Saint-Saens “Carnival of the Animals”, again reflecting the RAMM collection.


The open rehearsal will take place at 7.30pm on Thursday 1st March at St Peter's School, Quarry Lane, Exeter, EX2 5AP.  It is a free event, but all under-16s must be accompanied by an adult.  For further information about EMG Symphony Orchestra, this event and tickets for our spring concert, please visit emgsymphonyorchestra.org, visit our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter.


"Come and join us"
(Photography Nigel Cheffers Heard)



EMG Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Leo Geyer
EMG Symphony Orchestra
St Peter's School Quarry Lane
Thursday 1 March 7.30pm
OPEN REHEARSAL
(for 28 April Concert)
Musical Director: Leo Geyer
Leader: Clare Smith
Modest Mussorgsky: "Pictures at an Exhibition"
Camille Saint-Saëns: "Carnival of the Animals"
Admission FREE (U16 accompanied)




EMG Symphony Orchestra
Exeter Cathedral
Saturday 28 April 7.30pm
"A NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM"
Musical Director: Leo Geyer
Leader: Clare Smith
Camille Saint-Saëns: "Carnival of the Animals"
. . . . . . . (reimagined by Leo Geyer)
Modest Mussorgsky: "Pictures at an Exhibition"
Ralph Vaughan Williams: "Wasps" Overture
Carl Maria von Weber: "Der Freischutz" Overture
Alan Silvestri: "Night at the Muesum" Theme
Tickets: £10/£11/£13/£16 (U16 ½ price)
Online Booking: TicketSource
About EMG: Orchestra Website

Sunday, 11 February 2018

Kickline Touring Theatre Company "Twelfth Night" Exeter Barnfield Theatre Wednesday 7 February - Saturday 24 February 2018

Kickline Touring Theatre Company
"Twelfth Night"
Ben Charles is Officer
Miles Western is Sir Andrew Aguecheek - James Trafford is Curio
Gareth Evans is Fabian - Graham Seed is Malvolio - Perry Foot is Hercule

Will Trafford is Sebastian - Sioned Jones is Olivia - Che Watson is Duke Orsino
Dani Harmer is Viola - Philip Voyzey is Feste - Derek Frood is Sir Toby Belch
Katie Meller is Maria - Dan Ball is Antonio

After twenty years in the business Kickline Touring Theatre have returned to their roots with a classic slice of Shakespeare - "Twelfth Night" or "What You Will". Director Ian Berry has worked out an interpretation with his superb cast which is riveting and entertaining from the first scene to the last.


Even before the action starts, a wild baccanale seems to be taking place behind the scenes with raucous laughter, drunken cheers and the random thudding of legless dancing. The implication that the ensuing tale will be a drunken rampage is spot on, of course.

The famous opening line, "If music be the food of love, play on." is delivered by Che Watson as a very elegantly dressed, but somewhat sozzled, Duke Orsino. Straight away the production strays from the original script. James Trafford as Curio, pre-empting his opening line, relays the instruction literally to an off-stage string ensemble (actually a recording perfectly timed by Amy Spencer). Right on cue we hear music of the late baroque, setting the era of the production to the reign of George I.

Almost immediately the scene changes to a shipwreck in a storm at sea. Will Tippet's lighting converts Riannon Cheffers-Heard's versatile set into the rain lashed sails of a ship, picked out by lightening. Actors with great movement skills create the illusion of thrashing rigging with just three ropes (props: Mike Reddaway). Just audible against the sound of crashing waves is more baroque music - "Storm" from Antonio Vivaldi's "L'Estate", naturally.

Survivors of the Shipwreck in Illyria
Dani Harmer & Gareth Evans
Dani Harmer is Viola, apparently the sole surviving passenger from the wreck. Fortunately the ship's captain, played by a very familiar looking nautical cove, also survives and can answer all her questions about where they are, and who are the local nobility - and therefore the other characters in the play. This is all neatly and succinctly done, laying out the plot clearly. But it is time to move on, back to the present and those drunken revellers.

The sudden appearance of Derek Frood as Sir Toby Belch takes the whole experience in a new and exciting direction. Derek is still sporting the fabulous whiskers and flowing mane he cultivated for the part of Captain Bray in the TV series "Poldark". As Belch, his outrageous and bullet-proof self confidence, largely fuelled by drink, fills the whole stage every time he appears.

His merry crew of followers include Katie Meller as the flirtatious and mischievous Maria, Miles Western as Sir Andrew Aguecheek, the aspiring Belch who falls laughably short of his role model's natural bluster and wit, and the professional clown Feste who is played by Philip Voyzey. Philip has prepared his own musical versions of Shakespeare's songs for himself to sing in the role of Feste, accompanying himself on a dummy harpsichord (which also serves as a platform for the wild posturing of the incorrigible Belch) with perfectly coordinated recorded sound - all his own arrangement. Gold star!

Later they are joined by that mysterious sea captain, now in a new role - Signeur Fabian. The striking features and elegant bearing are instantly recognisable, as it's Gareth Evans - well known in Exeter as the outrageously hilarious comedy drag-queen 'Baby G'. As the dignified but devious Fabian, Gareth has developed a completely new way to mesmerise an audience with his comic movement and acting. A spectacular piece of casting.

The cowardly Aguecheek (Miles Western)
bemoans his injuries from a drunken brawl
to an indifferent Countess Olivia (Sioned Jones)
Looking on are the Abbess (Judyth Aarons),
Hercule (Perry Foot), Antonio (Dan Ball)
Orsino's Officer (Ben Charles)
Viola/Caesario (Dani Harmer)
Against this turbulent backdrop of bibulous slap-stick, several serious characters pursue a familiar Shakespearian plot-line. Viola, to survive in this strange land, has to pass herself off as a man. Now calling herself 'Caesario' she has somehow become Duke Orsino's personal servant, and carries Orsino's messages of love to Belch's niece (and host) Lady Olivia, played by Sioned Jones, with predictably confused results.

Meanwhile Will Trafford appears from time to time as Viola's identical twin brother Sebastian. Contrary to Viola's understanding, Sebastian has also survived the wreck and lives a life separated from the main characters with his nautical friend Antonio (Dan Ball). As Dani is the undisputed star, it was necessary to cast an actor in the part of Sebastian to look very like her.

Will's sumptuous costume is identical to hers. (All these fabulous costumes are provided by the National Theatre and fitted and maintained by Helen Dyer-Greeves and Kate Lyons.) Also his voice and mannerisms have been carefully crafted to match hers so that, although he is clearly a head taller, it is just conceivable that the other characters might not be able to tell them apart.


Tied in knots by his own vanity
Graham Seed is Malvolio
Through all this convoluted narrative, and hilarious horse-play, one character stands out. Graham Seed is the overwheeningly pompous, and painfully tragic, Malvoleo. As Director Ian Berry says, the play could almost be called "The Tragedy of Malvoleo". His misadventures trump every other part of the action. How dearly he would like to elevate his position in society (an outrageous notion in Shakespearian England) and have his love of the Countess Olivia requited.

The disgraceful cruelty of Belch's gang towards this unfortunate man is in no way justified by his eccentric ways or his unbending devotion to his mistress. The problem of bullying was as pernicious in Elizabethan England as it is in the present day. We have to wait until the final scene to see whether he will be relieved from his undignified travails.


Do stay tuned, however, for the final denouement viz-a-viz the confusion of the cross-dressing twins. With consummate skill the four main players Che, Dani, Sioned and Will - with the help of Dan as Antonio, wind up the yarn so neatly that even Malvoleo's trials are briefly forgotten. A splendid scene and the high point of the production.


This delicious romp in the fictitious faraway land of Illyria, is a thoroughly enjoyable spectacle and a perfect exposition of Shakespeare's weaving of complex narratives. All the actors acquit themselves admirably, filling the eye and ear with spectacle and fitting together perfectly like the pieces of a splendid baroque jig-saw puzzle.


The minor players play their part with impressive skill too. James Trafford's Curio is joined by Ben Charles and Will Pearce as convincing but gently caricatured Officers to the Orsino household. Perry Foot is the mysterious Hercule. Judyth Aarons and Natasha Pavey are maids in service to Lady Olivia, and Judyth also doubles as a comedy Abbess licensed to perform marriages - an essential ingredient in any Shakespearian comic tale.


This colourful and entertaining production continues for two more weeks.


From Wednesday to Saturday next week (14-17 February): evening performances at 7.30pm.

There is a matinée on Saturday 17 February at 2.30pm
There is a matinée on Sunday 18 February at 3pm.
On Wednesday, Friday & Saturday 21, 23 & 24 February: evening performances at 7.30pm
There is a matinée on Thursday 22 February at 1.30pm
There is a matinée on Saturday 24 February at 2.30pm.

Full-price tickets are £20.50 (premium seats in rows F & G £29.50)

Concessionary £15 tickets are available (unwaged, student, 60+, U16, disabled)

Details and booking is via the Barnfield Box Office: 01392 270891

Online Booking is via the Barnfield Wesite & TicketSolve



Kickline Touring Theatre Company

Exeter Barnfield Theatre
Wednesday 7 - Saturday 24 February
"TWELFTH NIGHT"
Director: Ian Berry
Duke Orsino: Che Watson
Countess Olivia: Sioned Jones
Viola (Caesario): Dani Harmer
Malvolio: Graham Seed
Sir Toby Belch: Derek Frood
Sir Andrew Aguecheek: Miles Western
Signeur Fabian: Gareth Evans
Feste the Jester: Philip Voyzey
Sebastian: Will Trafford
Maria: Katie Meller
Antonio: Dan Ball
Showtimes:
Wed-Sat 7-10 Feb 7.30pm
Sat 10 Feb 2.30pm Sun 11 Feb 3pm
Wed-Sat 14-17 Feb 7.30pm
Sat 17 Feb 2.30pm Sun 18 Feb 3pm
Wed/Fri/Sat 21/23/24 Feb 7.30pm
Thurs 22 Feb 1.30pm Sat 24 Feb 2.30pm
Tickets: £20.50 (premium rows F/G £29.50)
Concessions: £15 (unwaged, student, 60+, U16, disabled)
Barnfield Box Office: 01392 270891
Online Booking: TicketSolve

Thursday, 1 February 2018

Stephen Beville New Year Piano Recital Westgate Christian Fellowship Monday 22 January 2018

Piano: Stephen Beville

On Monday 22 January this year Stephen Beville returned to the stage with another fabulour piano recital. This time he concentrated on music inspired by childhood memories. The upper room of the Westgate Christian Fellowship was a particularly inviting and functional music venue. Although Stephen is not very familiar with the piano there, he was still totally in his element.

Stephen opened with Edvard Grieg's "Arietta" & "Berceuse", and Wolfgang Mozart's "Ah, vous dirai-je Maman" (Can you tell me Mother [what causes my torment]) - which is more familiar as the theme to "Twinkle, twinkle, little star". Mozart, of course, takes this simple piece in numerous exciting new directions as the the variations become ever more complex and inspired. Stephen performed each variation spectacularly.

 Then, in a change to the order of the advertised programme, he played the whole of Robert Schumann's "Kinderszenen" (Scenes from Childhood) in the first half, rather than the second. The theme of the suite is a reference to Schumann's own childhood. (The suite was completed two years before Robert and Clara were married.) Stephen's playful interpretation reflected Schumann's desire to delight and entertain his intended wife Clara - who had been forbidden to marry Robert by her father (Frederick Wieck). The young Robert Schumann, and his siblings, could be imagined rushing from toy to toy, playing games and enjoying stories. Lighthearted, but also very impressive.

After a leisurely break, with refreshments laid on by the Westgate Fellowship members in their cafeteria, Stephen returned to the piano for a two-movement sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven. The sonata pre-dates the Schumann suite by a quarter of a century. The manuscript bears Beethoven's very specific instructions in German:

First Movement:
"Mit Lebhaftigkeit und durchaus mit Empfindung und Ausdruck"
(With liveliness and with feeling and expression throughout)
Second Movement:
"Nicht zu geschwind und sehr singbar vorgetragen"
(Not too swiftly and conveyed in a singing manner)

Stephen followed the instructions to the letter, and reproduced Beethoven's early romantic masterpiece with a wealth of expression and emotion. Beethoven endlessly reasserted his brilliance as a composer, topping each passage with another of equal ingenuity. And Stephen was quite equal to the task of keeping pace with Beethoven's flights of genius.

Then came a unique suite of pieces, not often heard in concert. The composer, Sofia Gubaidulina, is now 86 and lives in Hamburg where she still works actively in music. She continues to add to her musical accolades, and last year the Boston New England Conservatory added to her already impressive list of honorary degrees.

Sofia was born in Tartarstan and was subject to residual Stalinist restrictions during her musical education and early career. Despite her unconventional ideas she was aided in her success by Dmitri Shostakovich. Graduating just as the Krushchev era began, Sofia was able to make a career composing for movies, and her scores can be heard on early documentaries in 'Kinopanorama' - the Soviet version of 'Cinerama'. Also, as the nineteen-sixties drew to a close, she composed her own suite of childhood memories for the piano - "Musical Toys".

Unlike Schumann, Gubaidulina brings a stark minimalism to her images. Often the melody is in a single line broken to great effect by pregnant pauses. Interspersed, are delightful bagatelles. The overall effect is very unconventional and engaging - sufficiently so, one imagines, to satisfy the aesthetic requirements of First Secretary Nikita Kruschchev.

Stephen played this demanding and virtuosic pieces with absolute precision and an ebullient sense of fun and mischief, just as Gubaidulina intended. Following Schumann's lead, Gubaidulina conjures up many different and contrasting memories from childhood, with strong overtones of her native Russia. Stephen was able to bring every one of her musical vignettes to life with great imagination, as well as technical skill.

The concert ended gently with two more classical compositions, this time by Frédéric Chopin. His "Berceuse" (Opus 54) was an obvious choice, followed by an equally delightful "Impromptu" in F sharp (Opus36). A spectacular finish to a spectacular concert.

Many thanks to Stephen Beville for all his work and for sharing his wonderful talent with Exeter audiences. Also thanks to Bob Jones and Mike Coles of the Westgate Christian Fellowship for organising such a splendid evening. We can look forward to more of Stephen's live performance in the near future, and recordings are also available (details below). Watch this space!


Piano: Stephen Beville


Recordings

After studying at the Royal Academy and Royal Northern College, Stephen also received a scholarship to study at Karlsruhe where he became a polished composer and performer - their best student. He began giving recitals while still in Germany and his debut recording album "In Karlsruhe" is now available on the 'Divine Art' label. Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin are included, of course. There is also yet another playful suite of miniatures, this time by Gubaidulina's French contemporary, Pierre Boulez.

Copies are available from Stephen's Website. We shall also enjoy extracts on tomorrow's "Classical Journey Redux" which will be broadcast between 9am and 12 noon from Studio 4, Dartington Space, Dartington Hall Estate on Soundart Radio (102.5 FM in the Totnes area, and streaming live on soundartradio.org.uk).

Wednesday, 31 January 2018

Arcadia String Quartet Courtenay Centre Newton Abbot Sunday 18 February 2018 Press Release from Anne White

Arcadia String Quartet
Courtenay Centre, Newton Abbot,
Sunday 18 February 3pm

Winners of the International Chamber Competition Hamburg in 2009, the Almere International Chamber Music Competition in 2011, the 2012 Wigmore Hall London International String Quartet Competition, and the 2014 Osaka International Chamber Music Competition, the Arcadia Quartet (formed in 2006 while students at the Gheorghe Dima Music Academy in Romania) is rapidly establishing itself as one of the most exciting string quartets of their generation.

With a busy international concert schedule taking them across Europe, they will perform in Newton Abbot as part of their UK 2018 tour.

The Arcadia Quartet have chosen to perform works of enormous contrast, encompassing wit and humour, lyric beauty, serenity, lightheartedness and stark intensity: in fact, the whole gamut of emotions. It will indeed be a concert to entertain and stimulate.

Josef Haydn: String Quartet No 30 in E flat, HobIII/38 “The Joke”
Alexander Borodin: String Quartet No.2 in D (1885)
Dmitri Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 8 in C minor, Op.110 “Dresden”

The concert is sponsored by Wollen Michelmore, Solicitors.

Venue:               Courtenay Centre, Newton Abbot TQ12 2QA
Date:                  Sunday 18 February 2018
Time:                  3:00pm
Tickets:              £15 (advance £13 members £10 student £2 child FREE)
Online Booking: TicketSource
Enquiries:           membership@nadsa.co.uk
Telephone:         01626 368318


PRESS RELEASE

Arcadia String Quartet
    Violin: Răsvan Dumitru
 Viola: Trakan Boal
ă
Violin: Anna Török  
 'Cello: Zsolt 
Török    

Enjoy an afternoon of entertaining and stimulating music at the Courtenay Centre, Newton Abbot, on Sunday 18 February at 3pm, when nadsaconcerts presents the Arcadia String Quartet in the 5th concert of the season. This multi-prize-winning quartet, formed in 2006 while students at the Gheorghe Dima Music Academy in Romania, is rapidly establishing itself as one of the most exciting string quartets of their generation.

The programme will consist of three notable and markedly contrasting creations: Haydn’s 30th quartet ‘The Joke’, Borodin’s 2nd quartet - a tuneful masterpiece, and Shostakovich’s autobiographical 8th.

Although Gregorio Allegri (1582 – 1652) and Alessandro Scarlatti (1660 – 1725), had already written sonatas for four string instruments without harpsichord, there can be no doubt as to Haydn’s unparalleled contribution towards the development of the string quartet. In his freeing of the cello from its traditional accompanying role, and his imposition of the Classical style upon the genre, he became known as the ‘Father of the String Quartet’.

Haydn’s music is well-known for its easy-going sense of humour and wit: his quartet,‘the Joke’, with its robust earthiness and gleeful unpredictability, is no exception. Second of a set of six written in 1781, ‘The Joke’ is the 30th of his 68 string quartets, and is a wonderful example of his incredible imaginative genius.

Born, illegitimate son of a nobleman and a peasant, in St Petersberg, Borodin (1833 - 87) enjoyed a good private education, had a brilliant career as a research chemist and professor of chemistry, and was a strong advocate of women’s rights. Composition, initially always secondary in his life, gained prominence in the 1870s, and it was owing to Liszt that his music began to be performed outside Russia during this period.

Borodin wrote his 2nd string quartet in 1881 (a century after Haydn’s ‘Joke’). Dedicated to his wife, Katerina, for their 20th anniversary, its haunting and, at times, overwhelmingly evocative lyricism has ensured its place in the hearts of listeners.

Shostakovich’s 8th quartet is a masterpiece of the twentieth century. Composed in only three days in 1960 during a visit to Dresden (to compose music for film), it was inscribed ‘In rememberance of the victims of Fascism and war’. 1960 marked a turning point in his life: he joined the Communist Party and his health deteriorated further. Shostakovitch filled this quartet with quotations from earlier works, and the main theme (based on his name) opens the work and recurs throughout. Despite its austere and tragic music, it enjoys outstanding appeal and is the most loved of all his 15 quartets.

The Arcadia String Quartet, having recorded both Janacek’s ground-breaking quartets, are in the process of recording the complete quartets of Bartok. They are an ensemble not to be missed.

NADSA Concerts
Arcadia String Quartet    
Courtenay Centre, Newton Abbot
(Kingsteignton Road TQ12 2QA)
Sunday 18 February 3pm
ARCADIA STRING QUARTET
Violin: Anna TörökRăsvan Dumitru
Viola: Trakan Boală
'Cello: Zsolt Török

Josef Haydn: “The Joke” String Quartet No 30
Alexander Borodin: String Quartet No.2 in D (1885) 
Dmitri Shostakovich: “Dresden” String Quartet No. 8
Tickets: £15
(advance £13 members £10 student £2 child FREE)
Online BookingTicketSource
Enquiriesmembership@nadsa.co.uk
Telephone: 01626 368318

Monday, 29 January 2018

Ruth Molins presents 'Flute@37' Flute Recitals 37 Clifton Road Newtown Sundays at 4pm from February 2018

Ruth Molins

Ruth Molins is a very popular and much admired flautist here in Exeter. For many years she has been performing with orchestras and ensembles, as well as giving solo performances, throughout Devon and beyond. In addition to her work with existing ensembles, Ruth has also started her own flute trio, 'Flute Cake', with Sophie Brewer and Jennifer Campbell. Many people have enjoyed their delightful music at weddings and other social occasions, as well as formal concerts.

Ruth also teaches flute (as well as piano), and founded 'Exeter Flutes' in 2016 to provide opportunities for her students to enjoy and learn from performing in a flute choir. Lessons take place in Ruth's music studio at 37 Clifton Road in Newtown, Exeter (next to the Globe). This year Ruth will be giving a series of solo performances in the music studio, with a chance to join Ruth for a cup of tea and discussion of the music.

These recitals will be a wonderful opportunity to share musical experiences with a very talented and creative musician. Ruth has always amazed audiences with her spectacular flute playing in concert performances - and also on air on the many occasions when she has performed live for us in the Phonic FM studio.

Below is the provisional list of recitals for 2018.
Tickets are £10, or £8 in advance
Advance booking will be through ruthmolins.bigcartel.com 

Sunday 18 February 4pm
Georg Philipp Telemann: "Fantasia in C"
Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier: "Etude No 17"
Alica Hart: "Scats"

Sunday 18 March 4pm
Hilary Taggart: "Kerry"
Niccolò Paganini: "Caprice No 24"


Sunday 15 April 4pm
Claude Debussy: "Syrinx"
Jacques Ibert: "Piece"

Sunday 20 May - TBA

Sunday 24 June 4pm
Arthur Honegger: "Dance de la Chevre"
Astor Piazzolla: "Tango Etude No 3"
Mike Mower: "Strutit"

Sunday 9 September 4pm
D B Thomas: "Carla" (alto)
Johann Sebastian Bach: "Cello Suite" Selection

Sunday 14 October 4pm
Pierre Octave Ferroud: "Trois Pieces"

Sunday 11 November 4pm
Sophie Dufeutrelle: "Couleur Neige"
Carl Nielsen: "The Children are Playing"

Sunday 9 December 4pm
Marin Marais: "Les Folies d'Espagne"

Thursday, 25 January 2018

John Wellingham Talk & Organ Recital St John's Church Bridgetown Totnes Wednesay 14 March 2018 A Message from Carolyn Stilwell

St John's Church
Bridgetown, Totnes

John Wellingham is giving a talk and recital at St John's Church, Bridgetown , Totnes on Wednesday 14 March at 7 p.m.

He is going to talk about three Totnes organs; the Father Willis organ at St Mary's Church , Totnes, the organ that was lost in the fire at St John's and the present organ, built by William Drake, which he will play.

John has been a major influence on British organ students. He is now in his eighties, and still active as an inspirational organ teacher at Oxford and Cambridge universities . He studied at Dartington College when Imogen Holst (later with John Clements) ran the music department.

He taught piano, organ and recorder at Eton and was a counter-tenor lay clerk in the Chapel Choir before leaving to study organ , harpsichord, viola da gamba, Gregorian chant and Lutheran chorales at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis in Switzerland.

In 1974 He founded the Loosemore Centre for Organ and Early Music in Buckfastleigh, the first early music centre in Great Britain. It closed in the early 1990s, but the organ building workshop remains open.

There will be a small charge for the talk, which is one of a series of talks the church have arranged to promote the history and heritage of St John's,and in aid of the St John's Church fund to renovate the church windows.


John Wellingham
John Wellingham
St John's Bridgetown Totnes
Wednesday 14 March 7pm
TALK RECITAL
ON THREE ORGANS
The Father Willis at St Mary's
The St Johns organ lost in the fire
& the present William Drake
(on which John will play a recital)
There will be a small charge to attend
Proceeds to the Church Windows Fund

Monday, 8 January 2018

Lunchtime Concerts Glenorchy Church Exmouth Wednesdays 3 January - 25 April 2018

Andrew Wilson & Elizabeth Holman
Piano & Violin Duets
Glenorchy United Reformed Church Exmouth
Wednesday 4 April
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Piano: Sam Baker
Soprano:
Victoria Armillotta
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 3 January 12.30pm
STELLA MARIS TRIO
"Queens of Baroque"
Piano: Sam Baker
Soprano: Victoria Armillotta
Mezzo Soprano: Iryna Ilnytska
(Sad news - Iryna not available
 - but Sam will play extra solo pieces)
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: David Lee
& Josephine Pickering
Baritone: Mark Hansford
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 10 January 12.30pm
PIANO & BARITONE
Piano: Josephine Pickering
Baritone: Mark Hansford
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Violin: Ruth James
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 17 January 12.30pm
PIANO & VIOLIN
Piano: Josephine Pickering
Violin: Ruth James
(plus piano duets with David Lee)
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: An-Ting Chang
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 24 January 12.30pm
PIANO RECITAL
Piano: An-Ting Chang
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Musical Director: Mark Perry
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 31 January 12.30pm
ST DAVID'S SINGERS
Musical Director: Mark Perry
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Sidmouth Orchestral Club
Musical Director: Alan Williams
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 7 February 12.30pm
SIDMOUTH ORCHESTRAL CLUB
Musical Director: Alan Williams
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: Sam Baker
Mezzo Soprano: Iryna Ilnytska
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 14 February 12.30pm
PIANO & MEZZO SOPRANO
Piano: Sam Baker
Mezzo Soprano: Iryna Ilnytska
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: Tim Othen
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 21 February 12.30pm
PIANO RECITAL
Piano: Tim Othen
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano & Organ:
Wensleigh Palmer
Soprano:
Jacqueline Palmer
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 28 February 12.30pm
PIANO, ORGAN & SOPRANO
Piano & Organ: Wensleigh Palmer
Soprano: Jacqueline Palmer
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Beacon Piano Trio
Violin: Anna Cockroft

Piano: Joyce Clarke
'Cello: Ruth Lass
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 7 March 12.30pm
BEACON PIANO TRIO
Piano: Joyce Clarke
Violin: Anna Cockroft
'Cello: Ruth Lass
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
"Quorum"
Soprano: Janet Macdonald
Piano: Margaret Chave
Clarinet: Philip Bonser

Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 14 March 12.30pm
QUORUM
Piano: Margaret Chave
Soprano: Janet Macdonald
Clarinet: Philip Bonser
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Guitar: Samantha Muir

Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 21 March 12.30pm
GUITAR & UKULELE
Guitar/Ukulele: Samantha Muir
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: Ruth Smit
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 28 March 12.30pm
PIANO RECITAL
Piano: Ruth Smit
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: Andrew Wilson
Violin: Elizabeth Holman
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 4 April 12.30pm
PIANO & VIOLIN
Piano: Andrew Wilson
Violin: Elizabeth Holman
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano: Joyce Clarke
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 11 April 12.30pm
PIANO RECITAL
Piano: Joyce Clarke
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Organ: Andrew Millington
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 18 April 12.30pm
ORGAN RECITAL
Organ: Andrew Millington
Admission FREE - retiring collection
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Piano:
Duncan Honeybourne
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Glenorchy Lunchtime Concerts
Glenorchy Church Exmouth
Wednesday 25 April 12.30pm
PIANO RECITAL
Piano: Duncan Honeybourne
Admission FREE - retiring collection